Rider’s Guide to New/Updated Street Motorcycles for 2019

This handy guide includes all new or significantly updated street-legal motorcycles for the 2019 model year (we might sneak in an early-release 2020 model here and there, too). Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos and links to details or, when available, road tests about each bike. This guide will be updated as more new/updated models are announced, and when we’ve had a chance to ride them and report our impressions.

2019 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory and RSV4 RR

2019 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory.
2019 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory. Image courtesy Aprilia.

For 2019, the superlative RSV4 1100 Factory gets a 1,078cc V-four that pumps out 217 horsepower, while the RSV4 RR’s 1,000cc V-four churns out a respectable 201 horsepower.

Read our First Look Review of the 2017 RSV4 here.

2019 BMW R 1250 GS

2019 BMW R 1250 GS
2019 BMW R 1250 GS

Apart from minor design changes, BMW’s flagship ADV model gets a revised engine with a bump in displacement and ShiftCam variable timing, plus updates to various electronics and rider aids such as Riding Modes, Dynamic ESA (electronic suspension), full-color TFT displays and new Dynamic Brake Control. Pricing starts at $17,695.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW R 1250 GS here.

2019 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure

2019 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2019 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.

BMW isn’t making us wait for a beefier Adventure version of its new R 1250 GS. Details are still scarce, but we do know the new big GSA gets ASC (stability control), ABS and two riding modes as standard.

Read our First Look Review of the R 1250 GSA here.

2019 BMW R 1250 RT

2019 BMW R 1250 RT
2019 BMW R 1250 RT

The R 1250 RT benefits from the same updates as the GS, including a revised engine with a bump in displacement and ShiftCam variable timing, plus updates to various electronics and rider aids such as Riding Modes, Dynamic ESA (electronic suspension), full-color TFT displays and new Dynamic Brake Control. Pricing starts at $18,645.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW R 1250 RT here.

2019 BMW R 1250 RS

2019 BMW R 1250 RS. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2019 BMW R 1250 RS. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.

Apart from the revised engine, the RS gets a style refresh that drops the asymmetrical, winking look of the S 1000 RR in favor of a sporty twin-LED headlight assembly. LED DRL (daytime running lights) are an option.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW R 1250 RS here.

2019 BMW R 1250 R

2019 BMW R 1250 R. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2019 BMW R 1250 R. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.

Apart from the new engine, the R 1250 R doesn’t change much from last year. Its mild style refresh does include a TFT display, a DRL option for the halogen headlight and new color options.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW R 1250 R here.

2019 BMW F 750 GS

2019 BMW F 750 GS
2019 BMW F 750 GS

For 2019, the street-oriented F 750 GS gets a bump in displacement to 853cc, dual counterbalancers, a slipper clutch and a total redesign, including a new fork and revised shock and a TFT display. Pricing starts at $10,195.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW F 750 GS here.

2019 BMW F 850 GS

2019 BMW F 850 GS Rallye
2019 BMW F 850 GS Rallye

The more off-road capable F 850 GS continues to use the same engine as the 750 (the nomenclature has always confused us as well), and it benefits from the same updates and redesign as its little brother. Pricing starts at $12,895.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW F 850 GS here.

2019 BMW F 850 GS Adventure

2019 F 850 GS Adventure. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2019 F 850 GS Adventure. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.

Changes from the standard F 850 GS include a more robust electrical system, a larger 6-gallon gas tank (compared to 4 gallons on the GS), a larger windscreen that’s adjustable in two positions, hand guards, wide enduro footpegs, adjustable foot brake and shift levers, engine protection bars and a steel luggage rack.

Read our First Look Review of the BMW F 850 GSA here.

2019 Can-Am Ryker

Can-Am Ryker
2019 Can-Am Ryker Rally (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The low-slung, stripped-down Ryker is the most accessible and fun to ride three-wheeler from Can-Am to date, and at a starting price of just $9,999, it’s bound to turn some heads and get more riders on the road.

Read our First Ride Review of the Can-Am Ryker Rally here.

2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon
2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

The original Scrambler from Ducati gets a style refresh, better suspension, cornering ABS, Ducati’s Bluetooth Multimedia System and more. There’s also a new Atomic Tangerine color, and pricing starts at $9,395. Other Scramblers in the lineup are also getting a mild refresh.

Read our First Look Review of the Ducati Scrambler Icon here.

2019 Ducati Hypermotard 950

2019 Ducati Hypermotard 950 SP. Image courtesy Ducati.
2019 Ducati Hypermotard 950 SP. Image courtesy Ducati.

Hooligans, rejoice! The third-generation 2019 Ducati Hypermotard has gotten a design refresh that includes a lighter curb weight, more power and a new throttle-by-wire system.

Read our First Look Review of the 2019 Ducati Hypermotard 950 here.

2019 Ducati Diavel 1260 and Diavel 1260 S

2019 Ducati Diavel 1260 S.
2019 Ducati Diavel 1260 S. Image courtesy Ducati.

For 2019, the Diavel 1260 gets a revised chassis that allows for even greater performance from the 1,262cc power cruiser.

Read our First Ride Review of the XDiavel S here.

2019 Ducati Multistrada 1260 Enduro

2019 Ducati Multistrada 1260 Enduro
2019 Ducati Multistrada 1260 Enduro (Photo by Milagro)

On the heels of the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260, the long-legged 1260 Enduro was announced for 2019. It gets the same X-Diavel-derived 1,262cc L-twin and improved ergonomics and rider controls, plus a (slightly) lower seat height and shorter suspension travel, the better for most of us to ride the thing. Base price is $21,999.

Read our First Ride Review of the Ducati Multistrada 1260 Enduro here.

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 R

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 R
2019 Ducati Panigale V4 R. Image courtesy Ducati.

The Panigale V4 R is, for all intents and purposes, a street-legal WSBK competition bike. Now powered with a 221-horsepower 998cc twin that complies with WSBK rules and wrapped in a new aerodynamic fairing with carbon fiber winglets, the V4 R is lighter and more powerful than ever.

Read our First Look Review of the 2018 Panigale V4 here.

2019 Harley-Davidson FXDR 114

2019 Harley-Davidson FXDR 114
2019 Harley-Davidson FXDR 114 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Technically part of the Softail lineup, the FXDR 114 power cruiser invokes the spirit of the V-Rod, with a raked-out upside-down cartridge-style fork, a wide 240 rear tire and 4-piston front calipers squeezing twin 300m discs. Pricing starts at $21,349.

Read our First Ride Review of the Harley-Davidson FXDR 114 here.

2019 Honda CB300R

2019 Honda CB300R
2019 Honda CB300R (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Replacing the tired CB300F, the “neo-sports cafe” CB300R is smaller, lighter and tighter, with a new chassis and suspension and available IMU-based 2-channel ABS, and claimed wet weight is only 313 lbs! Base price is only $4,649.

Read our First Ride Review of the Honda CB300R here.

2019 Honda CB500X

2019 Honda CB500X. Image courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CB500X. Image courtesy Honda.

The rider-friendly CB500X has received several updates for 2019, including a more off-road-ready 19-inch front wheel that replaces the old 17-incher, and increased suspension travel to 5.3 inches (front) and 5.9 inches (rear).

Read our First Look Review of the Honda CB500X here.

2019 Honda CB650R

2019 Honda CB650R. Images courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CB650R. Images courtesy Honda.

This fresh Neo-Sports Cafe model replaces the outgoing CB650F for 2019. Updates include a new LCD dash, a new inverted Showa fork, radial-mount 4-piston brake calipers, floating brake rotors and new wheels. It will be available in April 2019 at a starting MSRP of $8,899.

Read our First Look Review of the Honda CB650R here.

2019 Honda CBR650R

2019 Honda CBR650R. Images courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CBR650R. Images courtesy Honda.

Replacing the CBR650F, the new CBR650R features new styling with a more aggressive riding position, standard HSTC and assist-and-slipper clutch, an 11.6-pound weight loss, a new Showa fork, radial-mount 4-piston brake calipers and floating brake rotors, and redesigned wheels.

Read our First Look Review of the Honda CBR650R here.

2019 Honda CRF450L

2019 Honda CRF450L
2019 Honda CRF450L (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

If a “dirt bike with lights” is what you’re after, and you like the idea of Honda reliability, the CRF450L might be what you’re looking for. This 50-state-legal dual-sport is light enough and powerful enough to satisfy even hard-core dirt riders. Priced at $10,399.

Read our First Ride Review of the Honda CRF450L here.

2019 Honda Monkey

Honda Monkey
2019 Honda Monkey (Photo by Kevin Wing)

No, you’re not having a flashback to your childhood. This Monkey bike is derived from the 125cc, fully street-legal Grom, complete with electric start, fuel injection and even optional ABS. At 105 mpg (tested!), there’s a lot of fun to be had in this small package. Priced at $3,999 (ABS is a $200 option).

Read our First Ride Review of the Honda Monkey here.

2019 Indian Chieftains

2019 Indian Chieftain Limited
2019 Indian Chieftain Limited (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

The Chieftain, Chieftain Dark Horse and Chieftain Limited get a sleek restyle, while every Chieftain model gets new riding modes and rear cylinder deactivation. Pricing starts at $21,999 for the standard Chieftain.

Read our First Ride Review of the Indian Chieftain Limited here.

2019 Indian FTR 1200/S

2019 Indian FTR 1200 S
2019 Indian FTR 1200 S

This new flat-track inspired Indian is powered by a new liquid-cooled 1,203cc, 60-degree V-twin and is said to weigh less than 500 pounds. Bring on the sideways hooligan action, we say! Pricing starts at $12,999 for the standard model and $14,999 for the up-spec S version.

Read our First Look Review of the Indian FTR 1200/S here.

2019 Kawasaki ZX-6R

2019 Kawasaki ZX-6R KRT
2019 Kawasaki ZX-6R KRT

The potent ZX-6R gets a standard quick shifter, new styling with twin LED headlights and taillight, new instrumentation and new gear ratios for better low-end power. Perhaps the biggest news, though, is the price: starting at only $9,999, the ZX-6R is the new bargain in the supersport market.

2019 KTM 690 Enduro R

2019 KTM 690 Enduro R. Images courtesy KTM.
2019 KTM 690 Enduro R. Images courtesy KTM.

KTM’s capable “dirt bike with lights” gets a new chassis that lowers seat height to just 35.8 inches while keeping the same suspension travel, and it gets new styling based on the off-road EXC family for a more aggressive look.

Read our First Look Review of the KTM 690 Enduro R here.

2019 KTM 690 SMC R

2019 KTM 690 SMC R. Images courtesy KTM.
2019 KTM 690 SMC R. Images courtesy KTM.

For 2019, KTM has revised the chassis, engine, electronics and styling of the 690 SMC R supermoto. The new Dynamic LC4 690cc liquid-cooled single has less vibration and more power than before, with throttle-by-wire and a PASC slipper clutch.

Read our First Look Review of the KTM 690 SMC R here.

2019 KTM 790 Duke

2019 KTM 790 Duke
2019 KTM 790 Duke (Photo by Simon Cudby)

The highly-anticipated successor to the 690 Duke gets a new 799cc counterbalanced parallel twin with throttle-by-wire and an assist-and-slipper clutch. This road scalpel is sure to please anyone who loves to carve up the twisties. Pricing starts at $10,499.

Read our First Ride Review of the 790 Duke here.

2019 KTM 790 Adventure and Adventure R

2019 KTM 790 Adventure R
2019 KTM 790 Adventure R

Designed to split the difference between lightweight dual-sports that are less suitable for long-distance road riding and large ADV bikes that are too heavy for challenging off-road terrain, both versions are powered by the 799cc LC8c parallel twin first seen in the KTM 790 Duke, with the engine tuned to deliver its torque lower down in the rev range to fit the specific requirements of adventure riding. Details like weight, pricing and availability are TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the 790 Adventure/R here.

2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT and R

2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT
2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

The 1,301cc L-twin powering both the GT and the R gets titanium valves and intake resonator chambers for better low-to-mid-range power, while the GT gets revised WP semi-active suspension. Pricing on both is TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the KTM 1290 Super Duke GT and R here.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT.
2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

A new 850cc air-cooled longitudinal V-twin powers this all-new adventure tourer. Details are still scarce, but Guzzi says the V85 TT won’t be prohibitively tall, with a narrow waist, a new tubular steel frame and asymmetrical aluminum swingarm, and a single rear shock bolted to the right side of the swingarm. Pricing and other details are TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the Moto Guzzi V85 TT here.

2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 and Continental GT

2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT and Interceptor 650
2019 Continental GT (left) and Interceptor 650 (right) (Photo courtesy Royal Enfield)

These two 650 twins are the first global motorcycle models to come out of Royal Enfield, and so far we’re impressed! The air/oil-cooled 648cc parallel twin and Harris Performance-designed chassis are a perfect match, and at a base price of $5,799 for the Interceptor and $5,999 for the Continental GT (which includes a 3-year, unlimited mileage warranty) they’re a bargain.

Read our Road Test Review of the Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 and Continental GT here.

2020 Suzuki Katana

2020 Katana
2020 Suzuki Katana

The 2020 Katana features styling cues that pay direct homage to the 1981 original, and it’s built around the potent GSX-R1000 999cc inline-four. Suzuki also says it will be equipped with traction control, Easy Start and Low RPM Assist, and a twin-spar aluminum frame, braced superbike-style swingarm, KYB suspension, dual front Brembo Monobloc four-piston calipers, 310mm floating rotors and a model-specific LCD panel. Pricing is TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the Suzuki Katana here.

2019 Suzuki SV650X

2019 SV650X
2019 Suzuki SV650X

This cafe racer version of the popular SV650 sports a headlight cowl and side panels that mimic a half-fairing, clip-on handlebars, a brown stitched appearance seat and new four-piston front brake calipers. MSRP is $8,399.

Read our First Look Review of the Suzuki SV650X here.

2019 Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT Adventure

2019 V-Strom 1000XT Adventure
2019 Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT Adventure

The Adventure now includes a pair of 37-liter aluminum side cases that easily clip on and off their stainless steel mounts, along with its accessory bar, center stand and heated grips. Its tubeless spoked wheels are ready for on- or off-road adventures. MSRP is $14,599.

Read our First Look Review of the Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT Adventure here.

2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Touring

2019 V-Strom 650XT Touring
2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Touring

The new 650XT Touring is ready to go with tubeless spoked wheels, removable plastic side cases, an accessory bar, hand guards, a lower engine cowl and a center stand. For 2019 it comes in new Candy Daring Red for $9,999, and will be available in January 2019.

Read our Road Test Review of the 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 650 here.

2019 Suzuki GSX-R1000X

2019 Suzuki GSX-R1000X. Images courtesy Suzuki.
2019 Suzuki GSX-R1000X

This track-ready monster replaces last year’s GSX-R1000/ABS, and not only adds standard ABS but also a quick shifter. MSRP is TBD.

Read our First Ride Review of the 2017 Suzuki GSX-R1000 here.

2019 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

2019 Suzuki GSX250R ABS. Image courtesy Suzuki.
2019 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

In response to dealer and consumer requests, Suzuki has released a version of its GSX250R with standard ABS. MSRP is $4,899.

Read our First Ride Review of the 2018 Suzuki GSX250R here.

2019 Suzuki GSX-750Z and GSX-750 ABS

2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS. Image courtesy Suzuki.
2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS

The blacked-out GSX-750Z returns for 2019 with no ABS (and a lower price of $8,499), while the GSX-750 ABS now gets it as standard (MSRP is $8,899).

Read our Road Test Review of the 2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 here.

2019 Triumph Street Scrambler

2019 Street Scrambler in Cranberry Red.
2019 Triumph Street Scrambler

Big news for 2019 is a 10-horsepower boost in output, a new magnesium cam cover, a new lightweight crankshaft, dead shafts and balance shafts, a new mass-optimized clutch cover and a new lighter torque-assist clutch. It also gets a new Brembo 4-piston front brake caliper and a new cartridge-style fork. Pricing is TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the Triumph Street Scrambler here.

2019 Triumph Street Twin

2019 Triumph Street Twin
2019 Triumph Street Twin

The Twin gets the same engine changes as the Scrambler, including the power increase, plus the Brembo 4-piston front brake caliper and a new cartridge-style fork. The seat foam is thicker for better comfort and the entire bike has been lightly refreshed. Pricing is TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the Triumph Street Twin here.

2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC and XE

2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE in Cobalt Blue/Jet Black.
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE

This truly dirt-worthy Scrambler is powered by the same liquid-cooled, 270-degree crank 1,200cc parallel twin used in the rest of the Bonneville line, but with a special “Scrambler” tune and a 12.5-percent bump in power. It also benefits from a host of modern electronic whiz-bangs, plus fully adjustable suspension (Showa fork and Öhlins dual rear shocks) and much more. Pricing is TBD.

Read our First Look Review of the Triumph Scrambler 1200 here.

2019 Triumph Bonneville T120 Diamond and Ace Editions

Limited edition 2019 Bonneville T120 Diamond (left) and Ace (right). Images courtesy Triumph.
Limited edition 2019 Bonneville T120 Diamond (left) and Ace (right). Image courtesy Triumph.

These two limited-edition T120s commemorating the 60th anniversary of the original Bonneville have exclusive features and finishes, and include a signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.

Read our First Look Review of the T120 Ace and Diamond here.

2019 Ural Gear-Up and cT

2019 Ural Gear-Up. Images courtesy Ural.
2019 Ural Gear-Up. Image courtesy Ural.

They don’t look much different than any other Ural made in the last 30 years (or more), but for 2019 both the 2WD Gear-Up and 1WD cT get EFI and engine updates that should make them easier to live with.

Read more about the changes to the 2019 Ural sidecar rigs here.

2019 Yamaha Niken and Niken GT

2019 Yamaha Niken
2019 Yamaha Niken (Photo courtesy of Yamaha)

Yamaha brings the Leaning Multi-Wheeled (LMW) concept to production with the Niken, based on the Tracer 900 and with a max lean angle of 45 degrees. There are two versions: the standard Niken and the Niken GT, which includes touring features like hard luggage and a larger windscreen. Pricing starts at $15,999 for the Niken and $17,299 for the Niken GT.

Read our First Ride Review of the Yamaha Niken here.

Read our First Look Review of the Yamaha Niken GT here.

2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 and 900 GT

2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT
2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

The motorcycle formerly known as the FJ-09 has been updated for 2019 with new suspension including a fully adjustable fork, a 2.4-inch longer swingarm, smoother throttle response and a standard quick shifter. Upgrade to the GT for standard hard luggage, a full-color TFT display, cruise control, heated grips and a larger windscreen. MSRP is $10,699 for the standard, $12,999 for the GT.

Read our Road Test Review of the Yamaha Tracer 900 GT here.

2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

The Ténéré 700 will be coming to the U.S. in the second half of 2020. Images courtesy Yamaha Europe.
The Ténéré 700 will be coming to the U.S. in the second half of 2020. Images courtesy Yamaha Europe.

OK, it’ll be awhile before we actually get to see the new T7 in the flesh, but we do know it will be powered by the 689cc CP2 parallel twin used in the FZ/MT-07, housed in a new tubular steel double-cradle frame. Other details include a 62.6-inch wheelbase, almost 9.5 inches of ground clearance, a fully adjustable USD 43mm fork with 8.3 inches of travel, and remote preload-adjustable rear with 7.9 inches.

For more info, check out our First Look Review here.

2019 Yamaha YZF-R3

2019 Yamaha YZF-R3 in Team Yamaha Blue.
2019 Yamaha YZF-R3

For 2019, the littlest YZF gets a sporty redesign and a new inverted 37mm KYB fork, with a new triple clamp that puts the clip-ons 22mm lower for a more aggressive riding position. Pricing starts at $4,999.

Read our First Look Review of the Yamaha YZF-R3 here.

2019 Zero DS and DSR

2019 Zero DSR
2019 Zero DSR

The entry price-point DS ZF7.2 gets a 35-percent boost in power and an 8-percent higher top speed, while the DS ZF14.4 extends its range by 10 percent. Finally, the top-spec DSR gets dressed up with several popular items from Zero’s accessory catalog: a windscreen, tank grips, hand guards and a 12V power socket. Pricing and details are available at zeromotorcycles.com.

Read our First Look Review of the Zero DS and DSR here.

2019 Zero S

2019 Zero S
2019 Zero S

Upgrades to the dual-sport line drove parallel improvements in Zero’s street lineup with the S ZF7.2 offering the same 35-percent performance jump as the base model Zero DS ZF7.2. Meanwhile, the new longer-range Zero S ZF14.4 gets the DS ZF14.4’s 10-percent range increase. Pricing and details are available at zeromotorcycles.com.

Read our First Look Review of the Zero S here.

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