The Best Bikes for Smaller Riders (and Budgets): 2019 Edition!

Bigger doesn’t always mean better, and fortunately for those of us looking for a fun, affordable motorcycle there are more choices than ever. Nearly every manufacturer now offers at least one model that will fit just about any rider’s size and/or budget.

Scroll down for Rider’s 2019 list of Best Bikes for Smaller Riders and Budgets. When possible we’ve included a link to our review, making it easy for you to get a real ride evaluation. We’ve also included the 2019 model year’s U.S. base MSRP (as of publication), seat height and claimed wet weight (when a wet weight was not available from the manufacturer, the claimed dry weight is listed). For more details, you can read our review, which includes comprehensive specs, or click on the bike’s name to be taken directly to the manufacturer’s page.

Aprilia Shiver 900

2019 Aprilia Shiver 900
2019 Aprilia Shiver 900

Aprilia Shiver 900
$9,399
32.0-inch seat
480 lbs.

Read our 2018 Aprilia Shiver 900 road test review

BMW F 750 GS

2019 BMW F 750 GS
2019 BMW F 750 GS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW F 750 GS
$10,395
32.1-inch seat w/ optional 31.1-inch seat or 30.3-inch seat
493 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2019 BMW F 750/850 GS

BMW G 310 GS 

2018 BMW G 310 GS. Photo by Kevin Wing.
2018 BMW G 310 GS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW G 310 GS
$5,795
32.9-inch seat w/ optional 32.3-inch seat
374 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2018 BMW G 310 GS

How did the G 310 GS stack up against the Kawasaki Versys-X 300 and Royal Enfield Himalayan? Find out in our comparison test.

BMW G 310 R

The G 310 R is anything but boring. You can't see it, but I'm grinning inside my helmet.
2018 BMW G 310 R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW G 310 R
$4,750
30.9-inch seat w/ optional 30.3-inch seat
349 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2018 BMW G 310 R

Read “Monkey Butt 500” about riding 500 miles in one day
on a BMW G 310 R, Honda Rebel 300 and Yamaha XT250

BMW R nineT Pure

BMW R nineT Pure
BMW R nineT Pure (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW R nineT Pure
$11,995
31.7-inch seat w/ optional 30.5-inch seat
483 lbs.

Read our road test review of the BMW R nineT Pure

Can-Am Ryker

Can-Am Ryker
2019 Can-Am Ryker Rally (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Can-Am Ryker
starting at $8,499 (600cc model)
23.5-inch seat
594 lbs. (dry, 600cc)

Read our first ride review of the 2019 Can-Am Ryker

CSC RX3 Adventure

The 2016 CSC RX3 is a surprisingly capable small-displacement adventurer tourer, at a price point that is undeniably attractive. (Photos: the author and James Norris)
CSC RX3 Adventure (Photo by James Norris)

CSC RX3 Adventure
$5,395
31.9-inch seat
450 lbs. (dry)

Read our road test review of the 2016 CSC RX3 Adventure

CSC SG250 Cafe Racer

CSC SG250 Cafe Racer
CSC SG250 Cafe Racer

CSC SG250 Cafe Racer
$1,995
26-inch seat
273 lbs. (dry)

Ducati Monster 797+

2018 Ducati Monster 797+
2018 Ducati Monster 797+

Ducati Monster 797+
$9,295
31.7-inch seat
386 lbs. (dry)

Ducati Scrambler Café Racer

2019 Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer
2019 Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer

Ducati Scrambler Café Racer
$11,995
31.7-inch seat
432 lbs.

Ducati Scrambler Icon

2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon
2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

Ducati Scrambler Icon
$9,395
31.4-inch seat w/ optional 30.6-inch seat
417 lbs.

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2019 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
2019 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
$10,995
31.4-inch seat w/ optional 30.6-inch seat
417 lbs.

Read about Ducati’s updates to the 2019 Scrambler lineup

Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

2019 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.
2019 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

Ducati Scrambler Sixty2
$7,995
31.1-inch seat w/ optional 30.3-inch seat
403 lbs.

Read about Ducati’s updates to the 2019 Scrambler lineup

Harley-Davidson Street 500 / Street 750 / Street Rod

The 2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod is based on the Street 750, with sharpened handling and styling. It has a steeper rake, longer suspension travel and a higher seat height that enables deeper lean angles. (Photos by Brian J. Nelson)
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

Harley-Davidson Street 500 / 750 / Street Rod
starting at $6,899
25.7-inch seat
492 lbs. (dry)

Read our first ride review of the 2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Harley-Davidson SuperLow

Harley-Davidson Superlow
Harley-Davidson SuperLow

Harley-Davidson SuperLow
$8,699
25.5-inch seat
545 lbs. (dry)

Harley-Davidson Iron 883

Harley-Davidson Iron 883
Harley-Davidson Iron 883

Harley-Davidson Iron 883 / 1200
starting at $8,999
25.7-inch seat
545 lbs. (dry)

Check out our first look review of the 2018 Harley-Davidson Iron 1200

Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom

2019 Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom.
2019 Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom

Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom
$10,999
26.6-inch seat
562 lbs. (dry)

Honda CB300R

2019 Honda CB300R
2019 Honda CB300R (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Honda CB300R
$4,649
31.5-inch seat
318 lbs.

Read our first ride review on the 2019 Honda CB300R

Honda CBR300R

2019 Honda CBR300R.
2019 Honda CBR300R

Honda CBR300R
$4,699
30.7-inch seat
357 lbs.

Honda CB500F

2019 Honda CB500F.
2019 Honda CB500F

Honda CB500F
$6,199
30.9-inch seat
415 lbs.

Honda CBR500R

2019 Honda CBR500R.
2019 Honda CBR500R

Honda CBR500R
$6,699
30.9-inch seat
419 lbs.

Honda CB500X

2019 Honda CB500X. Image courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CB500X

Honda CB500X
$6,599 (2018 model, 2019 pricing TBD)
31.8-inch seat
428 lbs.

Read about the updates for the 2019 Honda CB500X

Honda CB650R

2019 Honda CB650R. Images courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CB650R

Honda CB650R
$8,899
31.9-inch seat
445 lbs.

Read our first look review of the 2019 Honda CB650R

Honda CBR650R

2019 Honda CBR650R. Images courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CBR650R

Honda CBR650R
$TBD
31.9-inch seat
456 lbs.

Read our first look review of the 2019 Honda CBR650R

Honda CRF250L

2017 Honda CRF250L
Honda CRF250L

Honda CRF250L
$5,199
34.4-inch seat
(like other dual-sports, soft springs help the bike squish down under a rider’s weight)
318 lbs.

Read our review of the 2017 Honda CRF250L Rally

Honda Grom

2019 Honda Grom.
2019 Honda Grom

Honda Grom
$3,399
30-inch seat
229 lbs.

Honda Monkey

Honda Monkey
2019 Honda Monkey (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Honda Monkey
$3,999
30.6-inch seat
232 lbs.

Watch our video review of the 2019 Honda Monkey

Honda NC750X

2017 Honda NC750X
2019 Honda NC750X

Honda NC750X
$7,999 (2018 model, 2019 pricing TBD)
32.7-inch seat
478 lbs.

Honda Shadow Aero

Honda Shadow Aero
Honda Shadow Aero

Honda Shadow Aero
$7,699
25.9-inch seat
560 lbs.

Honda Shadow Phantom

2019 Honda Shadow Phantom
2019 Honda Shadow Phantom

Honda Shadow Phantom
$7,899
25.8-inch seat
549 lbs.

Honda Super Cub C125

2019 Honda Super Cub C125
2019 Honda Super Cub C125 (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Honda Super Cub C125
$3,599
30.7-inch seat
240 lbs.

Read our 2019 Honda Super Cub C125 first ride review

Honda Rebel 300 / Rebel 500

2017 Honda Rebel 500
Honda Rebel 500 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Honda Rebel 300 / 500
$4,499 (300) / $6,199 (500)
27.2-inch seat
364 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the Honda Rebel 500

Read “Monkey Butt 500” about riding 500 miles in one day
on a Honda Rebel 300, BMW G 310 R and Yamaha XT250

Indian Scout Sixty

Indian Scout Sixty
Indian Scout Sixty

Indian Scout Sixty
$9,499
25.8-inch seat
542 lbs.

Read our road test review of the Indian Scout Sixty

Indian Scout

2019 Indian Scout.
2019 Indian Scout

Indian Scout
$11,999
25.8-inch seat
550 lbs.

Read about Indian’s 2019 Scout lineup

Kawasaki KLX250

2019 Kawasaki KLX250
2019 Kawasaki KLX250

Kawasaki KLX250
$5,349
35.0-inch seat (squishes way down under rider’s weight)
304 lbs.

Kawasaki Ninja 400

2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS
2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Kawasaki Ninja 400
$4,999
30.9-inch seat
366 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review of the 2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS

Kawasaki Ninja 650

2019 Kawasaki Ninja 650.
2019 Kawasaki Ninja 650

Kawasaki Ninja 650
$7,399
31.1-inch seat
426 lbs.

Kawasaki Versys-X 300

2019 Kawasaki Versys-X 300.
2019 Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Kawasaki Versys-X 300
$5,499
32.1-inch seat
386 lbs.

How did the Versys-X 300 stack up against the BMW G 310 GS and Royal Enfield Himalayan? Find out in our comparison test.

Kawasaki Versys 650

2019 Kawasaki Versys 650 ABS
2019 Kawasaki Versys 650 ABS

Kawasaki Versys 650
starting at $8,299
33.1-inch seat
478 lbs.

Kawasaki Vulcan S

2019 Kawasaki Vulcan S.
2019 Kawasaki Vulcan S

Kawasaki Vulcan S
starting at $7,099
27.8-inch seat
498 lbs.

Read our road test review of the Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe

Kawasaki Vulcan 900

2019 Kawasaki Vulcan 900.
2019 Kawasaki Vulcan 900

Kawasaki Vulcan 900
starting at $7,999
26.8-inch seat
617 lbs.

Kawasaki W800 Cafe

2019 Kawasaki W800 Cafe
2019 Kawasaki W800 Cafe

Kawasaki W800 Cafe
$9,799
31.1-inch seat
489.5 lbs.

Read our first look review of the 2019 Kawasaki W800 Cafe

Kawasaki Z125 Pro

2019 Kawasaki Z125 Pro.
2019 Kawasaki Z125 Pro

Kawasaki Z125 Pro
$3,199
31.7-inch seat
225 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the Kawasaki Z125 Pro

Kawasaki Z400

2019 Kawasaki Z400 ABS
2019 Kawasaki Z400 ABS

Kawasaki Z400
$4,799
30.9-inch seat
364 lbs.

Kawasaki Z650

2019 Kawasaki Z650.
2019 Kawasaki Z650

Kawasaki Z650
$6,999
30.9-inch seat
410 lbs.

Read our first ride review on the Kawasaki Z650 ABS

KTM 390 Duke

2018 KTM 390 Duke
2018 KTM 390 Duke (Photo by Kevin Wing)

KTM 390 Duke
$5,449
32.7-inch seat
359 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2018 KTM 390 Duke here

Moto Guzzi V7III Stone

Moto Guzzi V7III Stone.
Moto Guzzi V7III Stone

Moto Guzzi V7III Stone
$8,490
30.3-inch seat
470 lbs.

Royal Enfield Continental GT

2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT
2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT

Royal Enfield Continental GT
$5,999
31.1-inch seat
461 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT

Royal Enfield Himalayan

2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan

Royal Enfield Himalayan
$4,499
31.5-inch seat
421 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan

How did the Himalayan stack up against the Kawasaki Versys-X 300 and BMW G 310 GS? Find out in our comparison test.

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650
2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650
$5,799
31.6-inch seat
473 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Suzuki Boulevard S40

2019 Suzuki Boulevard S40.
2019 Suzuki Boulevard S40

Suzuki Boulevard S40
$5,799
27.6-inch seat
381 lbs.

Suzuki Boulevard C50

2019 Suzuki Boulevard C50.
2019 Suzuki Boulevard C50

Suzuki Boulevard C50
$8,299
27.6-inch seat
611 lbs.

Suzuki Boulevard C50T

2019 Suzuki Boulevard C50T
2019 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

Suzuki Boulevard C50T
$9,499
27.6-inch seat
644 lbs.

Suzuki Boulevard M50

2019 Suzuki Boulevard M50.
2019 Suzuki Boulevard M50

Suzuki Boulevard M50
$8,699
27.6-inch seat
593 lbs.

Suzuki DR200S

2019 Suzuki DR200S
2019 Suzuki DR200S

Suzuki DR200S
$4,649
33.3-inch seat (its soft springs compress under a rider’s weight)
278 lbs.

Suzuki DR-Z400S

2019 Suzuki DR-Z400S
2019 Suzuki DR-Z400S

Suzuki DR-Z400S
$6,749
36.8-inch seat (its soft springs compress under a rider’s weight)
317 lbs.

Suzuki GSXR250R

2018 Suzuki GSX250R
2018 Suzuki GSX250R (Photo by Enrico Pavia)

Suzuki GSX250R
$4,599
31.1-inch seat
392 lbs.

Read our review of the 2018 Suzuki GSX250R

Suzuki GSX-S750

2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS. Image courtesy Suzuki.
2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS

Suzuki GSX-S750Z
$8,499
32.2-inch seat
469 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2018 Suzuki GSX-S750

Suzuki SV650

2019 Suzuki SV650.
2019 Suzuki SV650

Suzuki SV650
$7,099
30.9-inch seat
432 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2017 Suzuki SV650

Suzuki SV650X

2019 Suzuki SV650X
2019 Suzuki SV650X

Suzuki SV650X
$8,399
31.1-inch seat
432 lbs.

Suzuki TU250X

2019 Suzuki TU250X.
2019 Suzuki TU250X

Suzuki TU250X
$4,649
30.3-inch seat
326 lbs.

Suzuki VanVan 200

2019 Suzuki VanVan 200.
2019 Suzuki VanVan 200

Suzuki VanVan 200
$4,649
30.3-inch seat
282 lbs.

A Man on a VanVan Without a Plan…read the story!

Suzuki V-Strom 650

2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650 ABS
2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650 ABS

Suzuki V-Strom 650
starting at $8,799
32.9-inch seat
470 lbs.

Triumph Street Scrambler

2019 Triumph Street Scrambler
2019 Triumph Street Scrambler (Photo by Kingdom Creative)

Triumph Street Scrambler
$11,000
31.1-inch seat
447.5 lbs. (dry)

Read our first ride review of the 2019 Triumph Street Scrambler

Triumph Street Twin

2019 Triumph Street Twin
2019 Triumph Street Twin (Photo by Kingdom Creative)

Triumph Street Twin
$9,300
29.9-inch seat
437 lbs. (dry)

Read our first ride review of the 2019 Triumph Street Twin

Triumph Street Triple

2019 Triumph Street Triple R.
2019 Triumph Street Triple R

Triumph Street Triple
starting at $9,950
31.2-inch seat
370 lbs.

2019 Yamaha Bolt.
2019 Yamaha Bolt

Yamaha Bolt
starting at $7,999
27.2-inch seat
542 lbs.

2019 Yamaha MT-07.
2019 Yamaha MT-07

Yamaha MT-07
$7,599
31.7-inch seat
403 lbs.

Read our road test review on the 2018 Yamaha MT-07

2019 Yamaha MT-09.
2019 Yamaha MT-09

Yamaha MT-09
$8,999
32.3-inch seat
425 lbs.

2019 Yamaha TW200.
2019 Yamaha TW200

Yamaha TW200
$4,599
31.1-inch seat
278 lbs.

Read our review of the Yamaha TW200

2019 Yamaha V-Star 250.
2019 Yamaha V Star 250

Yamaha V Star 250
$4,349
27-inch seat
326 lbs.

Yamaha WR250R

2019 Yamaha WR250R
2019 Yamaha WR250R

Yamaha WR250R
$6,699
36.6-inch seat (squishes down under rider’s weight)
295 lbs.

Yamaha XSR700

2019 Yamaha XSR700.
2019 Yamaha XSR700

Yamaha XSR700
$8,499
32.9-inch seat
410 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2018 Yamaha XSR700

We held onto our XSR700 for a long-term review; read it here

2019 Yamaha XT250.
2019 Yamaha XT250

Yamaha XT250
$5,199
31.9-inch seat
291 lbs.

Read “Monkey Butt 500” about riding 500 miles in one day
on a Yamaha XT250, BMW G 310 R and Honda Rebel 300

2019 Yamaha YZF-R3
2019 Yamaha YZF-R3 (Photos by Brian J. Nelson)

Yamaha YZF-R3
$4,999
30.7-inch seat
368 lbs.

Read our first ride review on the 2019 Yamaha YZF-R3

Zero FXS

2019 Zero FXS
2019 Zero FXS

Zero FXS
starting at $8,495
32.9-inch seat
251 lbs. (FXS ZF3.6 Modular)

Check out Rider’s Guide to New/Updated Street Motorcycles for 2019

23 COMMENTS

  1. I have been riding since 1974. I have a 27-inch inseam. Riders like me have few if any choices other than cruisers, which tend to be heavier than necessary and short on cornering clearance. This is how it’s always been. The motorcycling press and the motorcycle manufacturers simply write off anybody outside of the average. Not everybody wants to ride a cruiser.

    • Could not agree more. I have the Ducati Diavel which I got as a near compromise but the weight and cruiser length are still an issue. I will be seeking an alternative, downsizing, because I am not getting any bigger. The Diavel is a super fun machine but I have now dropped me and the machine 3 times. No significant damage done and I need help getting her off the ground, Embarrassed. Bet your ass.
      PS I am 65, 27in seam and have an artificial hip joint

    • I am 5ft 1″ and ride a ninja zx6r which was very uncomfortable at first, but like us short people do so well, ive adapted and it has become comfortable, still a little heavy at 440lbs but i have a Honda Helix that a ride when i want to really take it easy. i have an 86 and if you don’t mind looking like a dork, The Honda Helix is totally great.

  2. This list seems not so much dedicated to those with short inseams than to include models from each of the manufacturers that are your bread and butter. Let’s be honest, listing any bike with more than a 29 inch seat can not be accurately presented as suitable for the short rider and yet many of the bikes listed in the article were well over that figure. Even 29 inches would be a real struggle for may short riders. This article is just a puff piece for your advertisers, not a real attempt to list bikes for short riders.

    • Well, William, you’re welcome to come up with your own list based on your own criteria. The point of this list was to provide a cross-section of motorcycle models from as many manufacturers as possible (most of which are not advertisers) that strike a balance between seat height, curb weight and sticker price. You are correct that not all motorcycles on the list have “low” seat heights–which makes it clear to astute folks like yourself that not all manufacturers make motorcycles for riders with short inseams. We also excluded motorcycles with MSRPs over $12,000, which is why the number of cruisers–which have the lowest seat heights of all street-legal motorcycles–is limited.

      • Well maybe rather than having a little “pop”at William you should rename the article to “Best bikes for nearly short people” how you can even consider something like a Versys or Vstrom for short riders is ludicrous. I’m 5,7 but have an inseam of 28” and one of those is of absolutely no use to me without spending money on a lowering kit. Why manufacturers don’t give riders the “low” option like Triumph do on the on the 800 is beyond me. You can buy a comfort seat for most so why not have the option of a low seat and lowering kit as well.

  3. Great list, but…… You failed to mention a few motorcycles. One of which has the lowest seat height of any manufacturer. But let’s start with the others first before we get to the lowest.
    Harley Davidson Roadster – 29.5
    Harley Davidson Fat Bob – 27.7
    Harley Davidson Heritage – 26.3
    Harley Davidson 48/48 Special – 26.2
    Harley Davidson Low Rider – 26.2
    Harley Davidson Deluxe – 25.9
    Harley Davidson Street Bob – 25.8
    Harley Davidson Sport Glide – 25.7
    Harley Davidson Breakout – 25.6
    ….and the lowest of ANY motorcycle out there…….
    Harley Davidson Softail Slim – 25.5
    Yes, I am a rabid Harley Fan. I’m also an owner. While many of these bike weigh more than the ones on your list, the lower the CG, the easier the bike is to handle. I know many pencil thin women who are riding Harley Davidson Softail models and handle them with ease, because of the Low seat height. Many of the bikes on your list exceed 30″ and despite their light weight, tippy toeing a motorcycle for many riders can do horrible things to a riders confidence.
    Don’t believe or fall into the media and rider stereotype bull about Harley Riders, owners and the brand. Go to a dealer, sit on one, take it for a ride and judge for yourself. You don’t have to be the stereotype. Just be a rider and love your ride.

    • Yes, there are many more Harley-Davidsons and Indians and other cruisers with low seat heights, but with this list we tried to strike a balance between low seat height and weight and cost. We excluded motorcycles with MSRPs above $12,000.

  4. This list of motorcycles ruins my entitlement to sanctimonious nostalgia; everyone of them is better than what I started riding fifty years ago. And, taking into consideration inflation and cost of ownership, contemporary bikes are cheaper too. But, from where I sit, much of these improvements either go unrecognized or lost in the fog of bigger, faster and more autonomous technology. In my opinion, aside from hubris, 90% of people who ride bikes have no need to buy anything that isn’t represented in this category of motorcycle.

  5. I live and ride in the UK all year round and it is not uncommon to encounter fog. It amazes me that no motorcycle manufacturer pays any attention to fitting a rear fog lamp to a motorcylce, or more to the point why the regs don’t require one. Cars have been fitting them for years but motorcycles costing as much a car these days don’t have them. A rear fog lamp gives an approaching driver more time to plan as they will see you sooner. When riding in poor visibility you are more likely to be closer to other vehicles as you’re ability to see will restrict your speed….(be able to stop in the distance you can see and to the conditions), unfortuantely drivers will often follow the tail lights of vehicles infront of them but tend to sit further back when the vehicle in front has it’s fog light on. Note I am referring to using them legitimately not abusing them such as in rain. I bet none of the bikes listed here have any consideration to a rear fog light.

  6. The Triumph Bobber is missing from this list. Sadly, since my not tall wife traded here sportster low for one.

    Hopefully someday manufacturers will realize the sizable demographic of short riders who something besides cruisers!

  7. I am not clear why there was the need to conflate shorter bikes with cheaper (and less powerful bikes). It would be great if you simply ran a comprehensive list of ALL motorcycles at 30″/760mm or less, including cases where there is some factory low seat option of some higher bike. Somehow in the entirety of the Internet, there does not seem to be such a list. We are not as small a demographic as our statures would belie…

  8. As a long time short rider, (28″ in-seam) my dream bike would have a 28″ seat, weigh under 500lbs. It would have a windscreen and lowers to protect the legs. ………….Oh wait! It would have to be a miniature re-production of the Gold Wing 1800 I rode for ten years. The Honda CTX 700 I purchased later had a 28″ seat but chain drive and what felt like a hard tail. C’mon manufacturers, many of us want to ride long distances without giving up the comfort of a large touring bike.

  9. I miss the Honda Rebel 250. Their new Rebel 300 & 500 thta replaced it is hideous at best, just plain F’n awful…yechh

  10. I am a “medium” sized rider – 5’7″, but 29″ inseam. I have a Honda ST1300, which is listed as having a 31″ which is listed as having a seat height as low as 30.5″ (adjustable). It is “on the toes” for me at a stoplight. If I were shorter, this would be a stupid bike, as it is just too heavy, too hight a center of gravity (720 lbs). I agree that any seat height over 31″ cannot be listed as appropriate for a ” shorter” rider.

    Just a note: I did sit on a Kawasaki Ninja 650, and it did feel good. Maybe it has partly to do with seat width in the front.

    • Seat width does make a big difference. My BMW K1300GT was fairly narrow at the front of the seat and I could get both feet on ground with my 29″ inseam. The BMW R1150RT I had was much wider and even two-up I couldn’t flat-foot it. It made me nervous in difficult parking situations so I sold it and got the GT.

  11. Kawi 650 Vulcan should definitely be on this list. Real good performance, reliability, low seat, style, price. Needs more ground clearance, but I have found that fitting taller tires and putting suspension to highest setting makes a very nice improvement.

    • The Kawi 650 Vulcan is a great bike, in the article they neglected to say it was a 650. I’m 5″, 115 lbs, have had mine for 3 years and love it. I’ve taken long trips on it for up to 2 weeks at a time and never been uncomfortable.

  12. Since I am a short rider with a 28” inseam, I always looked for ways to modify my bikes. Manufacturers need to design bikes with adjustable seat height, begs and handlebars so you can customize your bike without an extra cost or compromise its performance! That will make the bikes available to more people and everyone will be happy!

  13. I’m 6’1″, 230 pounds, with a 31″ inseam. I’ve been riding for almost 50 years and the most expensive motorcycle I ever bought was brand new 1976 BMW R90/6 for about $3400, as I recall. I’ve owned many street and touring bikes, but my most comfortable one ever is the CN250 Honda Helix scooter that I currently ride. It fits me to a T. Some of the bikes on this list I might enjoy owning, but since here in the Northeast US our riding time is interrupted by winter, most of my riding is now recreational, as opposed to the daily commuting I used to do before retirement. Personally having been in the car business for decades and understanding depreciation, I have not bought a brand new bike since my BMW, and I certainly never will again (although I certainly do wish that I had kept that one).

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