Home > MANUFACTURER > BMW Road Tests and Reviews > 2017 BMW F 800 R & F 800 GT | First Look Review

2017 BMW F 800 R & F 800 GT | First Look Review

Jenny SmithNovember 08, 2016
The 2017 BMW F 800 R (left) in BMW Motorsport colors and F 800 GT (right) in Gravity Blue metallic matt. (Photos: BMW)

The 2017 BMW F 800 R (left) in BMW Motorsport colors and F 800 GT (right) in Gravity Blue metallic matt. (Photos: BMW)

BMW’s F 800 R and F 800 GT have proven popular with smaller riders, and for 2017 both models are receiving updates and new color options.

2017 BMW F 800 R.

2017 BMW F 800 R.

Perhaps the biggest change is the addition of ride-by-wire, which enables riding modes. Rain and Road riding modes will come as standard on both models, while Dynamic ride mode will be equipped as an option. A revised instrument cluster will now include the chosen riding mode, as well as new dials that are easier to read.

Check out the 2015 F 800 R and see what’s new this year.

2017 BMW F 800 GT.

2017 BMW F 800 GT.

Both bikes will have a newly Euro 4-compliant, liquid-cooled, 798cc parallel twin engine that is good for a claimed 90 horsepower. The F 800 GT will also have minor cosmetic changes, including a windshield with “F 800 GT” inscribed on it and a new-look model designation on the bodywork.

Read our Road Test Review of the 2013 BMW F 800 GT.

2017 BMW F 800 R in Racing Red non-metallic.

2017 BMW F 800 R in Racing Red non-metallic.

The 2017 F 800 R will be available in Racing Red non-metallic, Blackstorm metallic and BMW Motorsport colors (Lightwhite non-metallic/Lupine Blue metallic/Racing Red non-metallic). The 2017 F 800 GT will be available in Gravity Blue metallic matt, Lightwhite non-metallic and Blackstorm metallic. The F 800 R will also have “Design Option” wheels available, which adds a decorative red line around the edge of the wheel rim.

2017 BMW F 800 GT in Lightwhite non-metallic.

2017 BMW F 800 GT in Lightwhite non-metallic.

BMW Motorrad accessories will be available for both models, including taller handlebars for the F 800 R, a new HP exhaust for both and various seat height options.

US pricing and availability are TBD.

One comment

  1. having owned a f800gt for a little over 3 years I’d like to leave a few comments on it. first off Ill say that it is a good motorcycle for a new rider, that is if they have 14,000 dollars to spend for a GT or 11 or 12 grand for a R. In 2013 I bought the GT new and I was a new rider at the time and unfortunately last year I was involved in a accident that totaled the bike. But make no mistake I wish to the heavens that I still had it. My f800gt was comfortable, handled great, did really good on mileage (until I changed the exhaust) but even then it wasn’t bad at all. I took the bike on the highway and wanted to see what I could get out of it, one of my friends said he clocked me at over 130 so that isn’t really to bad for a two cylinder bike. I didn’t then and I don’t plan on it now of making it a habit of going that fast but I was surprised that it did that good.
    Now here is where I think that BMW is giving this bike a major screw job, even with what I just said about how well the performance was, for the size and price of the GT its underpowered and over priced. The R model isn’t all that bad but its still maybe about 1000 dollars to high as well. I don’t think BMW realizes what a cash cow the GT could be for a long time to come. Ive seen so many walk away from the GT once they were told that its only a 90 hp bike. and the salesman at the BMW dealership here told me that he has a hard time selling them because of that. So it needs a performance upgrade to at least 100-105 hp and in the upper 60’s to 70 in torque at the least. Second thing is it needs a face lift, it isn’t 2006 anymore and the GT needs a fresh look that will distinguish away it from the old BMW f800st. For example In 1997 I bought my first Honda accord best car I ever owned, in 2004 I bought a second accord but by then Honda had change the body style and gave it a little more power made it a better car. I think its funny that BMW will take a bike like the s1000rr (a sport bike built to come close to breaking the sound barrier) and put a cruise control on it, or take the motor from the s1000rr and put it on a adventure bike frame and trick it out as well, and how many models of bikes does BMW have with the ugliest motor in the world (the boxer) yet the best the F800gt can get it a new paint job and some minor upgrades that wont help it sale any better then it has. As for the R model as a entry level bike its fine, but do you really need 2 entry level bikes that are both over 11,000 dollars. I’m disappointed in BMW because the f800gt has so much more potential to be the top dog in its class (middle weight sport touring) for a long long time to come but for some reason BMW chooses to dance around it to push bigger, heavier, and in some cases less attractive, much more expensive (even for BMW) bikes. The last thing i’ll say is after my accident it was almost 3 months before I got a new bike, I upgraded to a k1300s. But before I got it I really struggled between switching brands, I thought about a zx14 but decided that was a little more bike then I wanted and I knew that the k1300 was a better bike for touring, getting another f800gt but couldn’t justify over 14,000 when a new zx14 was only about 800-900 dollars more, the 0NLY reason I decided to go ahead and get the k1300s was I got great finance rate 0.9 if not for that I probably would not have a bike at all right now. if BMW were to put the GT back on the operating table and give it a fresh more modern look (meaning get away from that big cyclops front) at the least, and a performance upgrade I wouldn’t have a problem trading my k1300 for it but unless that happens, if something happens to my K3 it may not my last bike but BMW would have really impress me if I were to get another BMW.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*