2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber | First Look Review

The all-new 2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber is powered by a specially tuned "high torque" 1,200cc parallel twin.
The all-new 2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber is powered by a specially tuned “high torque” 1,200cc parallel twin.

At the Intermot motorcycle show in Germany earlier this month, Triumph unveiled three new Bonneville models—the Bonneville T100, Bonneville T100 Black and Street Cup—which are powered by its 900cc “high torque” parallel twin, a new engine that debuted in the Street Twin for 2016.

Read about the 2017 Triumph Bonneville T100 and T100 Black

Read about the 2017 Triumph Street Cup

The British manufacturer has just announced another Bonneville model called the Bobber that’s powered by the 1,200cc “high torque” parallel twin found in the Bonneville T120 and T120 Black, a pair of stylish models that won Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year award for 2016.

The Bonneville Bobber has slash-cut, sawed-off peashooter mufflers tuned for a raw, thrilling sound.
The Bonneville Bobber has slash-cut, sawed-off peashooter mufflers tuned for a raw, thrilling sound.

Triumph calls the new Bobber a “pure Bonneville hot rod,” with special engine tuning that makes more low-end power and torque than the T120 and dual exhausts with slash-cut, “sawed off” peashooter mufflers that deliver a raw, thrilling sound. The Bobber has a unique twin airbox setup, a special intake and exhaust system, and a new output shaft, and elegant packaging allows the straight-line exhausts to hide the Euro4-compliant catalytic converters. The engine is mated to a 6-speed transmission with a torque-assist clutch and chain final drive.

With styling inspired by bobbers from the 1940s, this new Triumph is stripped to the bare essentials. It has a wide, flat handlebar, a floating aluminum seat pan with a stitched, deep-foam solo pad, a “swing cage” that hides the rear monoshock and gives the bike a hard tail look, and spoked wheels with black rims shod with tube-type Avon Cobra tires.

The Bonneville Bobber has a wide, flat handlebar with bar-end mirrors. The twin gauges are adjustable to match the riding position.
The Bonneville Bobber has a wide, flat handlebar with bar-end mirrors. The twin gauges are adjustable to match the riding position.

Other special styling features include a battery box with a stainless steel strap, bar-end mirrors, a rear fender loop, twin throttle bodies that look like carburetors, over-sized adjustable levers, rubber fork gaiters, a rear “drum brake” inspired hub and a sprocket cover with a removable inspection cap. Premium finishes, special badges and covers, a branded, locking fuel cap and silver satin and graphite handlebar risers round out the factory custom look.

An innovative slotted seat design system allows the rider to position the seat “up and forward” in a sporty roadster position or “down and backward” for cruising in a more traditional riding position. A quick-release function for the gauges allows the rider to adjust their position to complement their seating and riding style, and regardless of position, seat height is a low 27.2 inches.

Triumph gave the Bonneville Bobber a unique solo seat that is adjustable for sport riding or laidback cruising.
Triumph gave the Bonneville Bobber a unique solo seat that is adjustable for sport riding or laidback cruising.

The Bobber has an all-new frame, chassis and suspension suited to this style of bike. Like other Bonnevilles, the retro-styled Bobber is fully modern, with throttle-by-wire, riding modes (Road and Rain), switchable traction control and ABS.

Befitting its factory custom image, the new Bonneville Bobber is available in four color options: Ironstone with a matte finish, Morello Red, two-tone Competition Green/Frozen Silver and classic Jet Black. For customization, there will be more than 150 accessories available, everything from apehanger handlebars, Vance and Hines exhausts and a Fox rear shock to a cruise control kit, heated grips and a comfort seat.

Pricing and availability for the 2017 Triumph Bobber are TBD.

2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in Morello Red
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in Morello Red
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in matte Ironstone
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in matte Ironstone
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in Competition Green/Silver Ice
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in Competition Green/Silver Ice
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in Jet Black
2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber in Jet Black

 

15 COMMENTS

  1. WOW!! Triumph is finally tapping into their heritage and building a badass bike. The seat needs further styling to integrate better but this bike is an ultra-cool alternative to a Sportster or any number of metric bikes. I love it.

  2. I’d like to see a low tunnel tank option, get the bottom of the tank parallel with the frame. And a side-mounted license plate. And western bars. Otherwise I think they nailed it!

  3. As someone said, the seat diesn’t integrate well – could some dummy coil springs benadded and more generous padding? A side mounted rear numberplate would be cool but, all in all, a great starting point. Can’t wait to try one out.

  4. Man oman.If my old legs would bend I would have a new Triumph Bobber,or Bonnie.That is ok I love my America LT,and Thunder Bird.Time for a new T.Bird LT.

  5. A beautiful bike, ruined by Triumph’s old school insistence on chain drive.

    I have always ridden 14,000 to 18,000 miles a year on my bikes, and I cannot abide the oil slinging, stretching and constant adjustment a chain requires . . . not to mention the fact that the sprockets need replacement every second or third chain replacement. AThe way I ride, a chain is just an added expense and bother I don’t want to deal with.

    If a torque monster like the Star Stratoliner (which I rode for five years) can go 72,000 on the original Kevlar reinforced drive belt, surely this piddly (but no doubt quick) 1200cc bobber could do the same!

    • William, I agree. Having owned shaft, chain, & belt drive bikes, I see no reason to use anything beside belts on any street bike. I put over 80,000 miles on my last Ultra and when I asked the Harley shop to change the original belt they told me I was wasting my money, it was still excellent. Better & cheaper than shaft drive too and doesn’t absorb the horsepower or require the maintenance of a shaft. The only bikes that a chain makes sense on are dirt bikes (stones & belts do not mix well).

  6. i liked the looks. then it has A SPECIAL this ,and special that. it’s a damn motorcycle! i’m surprised it doesn’t have a SPECIAL chain! i’m surprised it has a chain.the only manly part the owner will still take it to the dealer to have it specially adjusted by special people.

  7. great bike!! I would love ride and have one, and I’m sure I will as soon as it gets here in US. And I tell you, I’ve been riding a Confederate Hell Cat that turn eyes everywhere I go and in my opinion this Bonneville will rock.

  8. WHY COMPLAIN ABOUT THE CHAIN DRIVE? If it came with a belt drive, it would look out of place and I’m sure someone could make bouko’s with a chain drive kit. A drive shaft would not only look balky and out of place, they are horrible in corners. Designing this bike to look retro a chain is the only reasonable way to go. Modern lubricants keep any splayed grease to a minimum. So what if you have to replace the drive chain and sprockets at 80,000 miles. It is cheap and easy to do.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here