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2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod | First Look Review

Jenny SmithMarch 09, 2017
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

The 2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod is the first factory custom based on the liquid-cooled, Revolution X-powered Street 750.

Responding to an expanding global market, as well as the desires of a new generation of riders here in the U.S., Harley-Davidson has surprised us with a genre-bending new model, the 2017 Street Rod. Looking a bit like the offspring of a flat-tracker and a supermoto, the Street Rod was born as an effort within the Motor Company to proactively create the first custom Street 750, before, as Product Planning Manager Jeff Strunk says, “Roland Sands or somebody else got to it first.” Lead Designer Chetan Shedjale’s RDX800 concept was chosen as the winning design, with a focus on an edgy style and stoplight-to-stoplight, urban warrior performance. Despite its obvious resemblance to the recently announced XG750R American Flat Track race bike, Shedjale was careful to point out that the Street Rod is not a replica-racer. Instead, its styling was meant to appeal to a global audience—albeit with a healthy dash of “Americana.”

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod cockpit

Behind the Street Rod’s bikini fairing is a single instrument cluster and a flat, drag-style handlebar with bar-end mirrors.

Stopping short of wild performance claims, Harley’s team explained to us that they wanted the Street Rod to not only look the part, but also offer an exciting and nimble ride, especially in urban environments. Harley steepened its rake from 32 to 27 degrees, increased the rear suspension travel by 31 percent, to 4.6 inches, and gave it a stiffer 43mm upside-down fork and a slightly longer swingarm. The rider sits 4.1 inches higher (at 30.7 inches) on a scooped seat, reaching forward to a flat, drag-style handlebar. Lightweight, 17-inch cast aluminum wheels front and rear are shod with sporty Michelin Scorcher 21 tires, and up front, two big 300mm discs provide stopping power (ABS is standard). Because of its increased ride height, the Street Rod is capable of lean angles of 37.3 degrees (right) and 40.2 degrees (left) vs. 28.5 degrees for the standard Street 750.

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod Revolution X engine

Powering the Street Rod is a “High Output” version of the Street 750’s Revolution X liquid-cooled V-twin that pumps out a claimed 8 percent more torque and 18 percent more horsepower.

Powering the Street Rod is a “High Output” version of the Street 750’s Revolution X liquid-cooled V-twin that, thanks to improved airflow, a new dual-throat throttle body, valve changes and a bump in compression, pumps out a claimed 8 percent more torque and 18 percent more horsepower. The fun lasts longer too, with an increase in redline from 8,000 to 9,000 rpm.

The 2017 Street Rod is available in three colors: Vivid Black, Charcoal Denim and Olive Gold. Availability and pricing are TBD.

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Styling of the 2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod styling is meant to appeal to a global audience, with a healthy dash of “Americana.”

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod seat

Compared to the Street 750, the Street Rod has a 4.1-inch taller (30.7 inches) scooped seat.

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod front wheel

Lightweight, 17-inch cast aluminum wheels front and rear are shod with sporty Michelin Scorcher 21 tires, and up front, dual disc brakes with ABS provide stopping power.

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod rear shock and exhaust

Compared to the Street 750, the Street Rod has 31-percent longer rear suspension travel (4.6 inches) and and a longer swingarm.

8 comments

  1. Holy cow. Is this manufacturer this out of touch?

  2. If the price is competitive it ought to sell to those who appreciate function and style and to those willing to slowly back away from cults determining their ride . . . and also those wouldn’t mind a Kansas City assembled motorcycle. Sounds good to me. But here’s my question: How come Triumph can’t mass produce a “classic” fuel tank without a a pinch-weld like HD does? Again, well done HD!

  3. I like it!

  4. Russell Clodfelter

    With three disk brakes look like you can actually stop this “Street” without drama. Question, what is the primary drive? If its a chain, no thanks.

  5. I like the look. Clean and understated, purposeful and sporty. Not surprising it is reminiscent of the recent XR1200. Price is right too, Harley hit the nail on the head if they wanted to get younger non-HD riders. You could own and ride this bike without dressing up like a pirate.
    GS Rider

    • Chris, shame on you. Dissing conventional Harley riders as posers “dressed up like pirates” is sophomoric at best. As an owner of both a BMW GS-A and HD Street Glide, I dress the same riding both and don’t see the typical Harley rider negatively (or find them dressed up as outcasts); most of us enjoy the relaxed riding position, throbbing exhaust note, and low-end torquey feel of a Harley. We also like the quality that Harley provides. Insulting other motorcyclists is not what our sport is about.

  6. They have to go down a different road to get new people on their bikes. Personally I don’t care for the execution at all but hey lets see if it sells. i also see that Harley folk love dressing like Pirates. More of them than not. Frankly it turns me off to the hole look at me I’m part of the group thing. Its like they have to make up some kind of visual identity for themselves. Its childish. How about just good solid riding gear and a wave.

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