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2017 Honda Rebel 500 and 300 | First Look Review

Mark TuttleNovember 18, 2016
2017 Honda Rebel 500

2017 Honda Rebel 500

Honda headed up a nearly full slate of returning 2017 machines today with two new ones, the Rebel 500 and 300. Based on the 471cc parallel twin in the CB500F and the 286cc single in the CB300F, the bikes are a mix of old- and new-school style, with aggressively raked front ends and fat tires on 16-inch wheels. Riding positions are relaxed and neutral, with arms gently outstretched and feet dropping straight down to mid-mounted pegs, and both the Rebel 500 and Rebel 300 are available in standard and ABS versions. Aimed squarely at new and returning riders, the smaller bike will replace the Rebel 250 twin that Honda has produced on and off since 1985, both in its lineup and probably in motorcycle training courses around the country.

2017 Honda Rebel 300

2017 Honda Rebel 300

“For many riders who have grown up through the digital age, motorcycles represent a lifestyle and an attitude, a means of expressing their individuality,” said Lee Edmunds, Manager of Motorcycle Marketing Communications at American Honda. “The machines that speak to these riders need to reflect this, to fit with their life while also offering the potential for further individualization. The Rebel 500 and Rebel 300 are simple and raw, offering cutting-edge style and a radical image while minimizing the barriers to riding.”

Colors

Rebel 500: Matte Silver, Bright Yellow, Black, Red

Rebel 500 ABS: Black

Rebel 300: Matte Silver, Matte Pearl White, Black, Red

Rebel 300 ABS: Black

Rebel 300 Tentative Price: $4,399 (MSRP Announcement Dec. 2016)

Rebel 500 Tentative Price: $5,999 (MSRP Announcement Dec. 2016)

Availability: April 2017

Honda also announced that many of its 2016 models will be returning for 2017, including the CBR600RR, CBR500R, CBR300R, CB500F, CB300F, Africa Twin, VFR1200X, NC700X, CB500X, Gold Wing F6B Deluxe, Fury, CTX700 DCT, Ruckus and Metropolitan.

4 comments

  1. Looking forward to the new 2017 Honda Rebels ( 300 & 500 ).

    Couple of questions
    1) .. Do you happen to know the estimated MPG on both 2017 Honda rebels (300 & 500) ??
    2) .. How about mph cruising speed in 6th gear for both 2017 Honda rebels (300 & 500) ??

  2. Robert A. Gilmore

    Are the 2017 Honda rebels sidecar capable?

  3. You can look at current models with the same engines to predict mpg. CB300F gets a 78 rating; CBR300R gets a 71 rating; both probably underrated, as this single-cylinder 286 is likely the most fuel efficient motorcycle engine on the planet and can easily achieve 80 at modest highway speeds. The Rebel 300 is slightly de tuned with slightly more torque down low than the CBR300R, and should come in with a rating at least up to mid seventies and maybe up to 80. In the real world, if one is riding with efficiency in mind, I’d bet it’ll reach upper 80s on a warm, calm day keeping speeds down to 70 or below. The question with the Rebel 300 is how well it’ll slip through the air. The better the aerodynamics, the better the highway mpg will be, and the better it’ll perform as a highway cruiser.

    The CB500F & X & R used to rate at 71, but nowadays it has no estimate. Seventy-one seems about right. Looking at Fuelly, several riders report as high as 68 as their average and I’ve found that few riders ride conservatively, so Fuelly usually indicates an underestimate for those who ride for practicality. So I’d guess that the Rebel 500 should come in around 70-74 when focusing on good fuel economy for highway riding 70 or below.

    I’ve got a standard-shift CTX 700 with Honda’s 670 parallel twin. I can get real-world 78 commuting in the summer. I know that the 300 can do better than the 670, however, my guess is that my low-revving 670 has better potential than the 471 that will power the Rebel 500. Honda’s smaller bikes absolutely destroy other brands when it comes to mpg, but the 286 single, and the 670 parallel twin are amazingly efficient.

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